Posts tagged: Early Intervention

Ethics of Genetic Testing: Would you like to find out your risk of getting Alzheimer’s disease?

Earlier this year Jessica and Gabi in BeGOOD’s blog ‘Should young people get genetic testing?’ examined the positive and negative implications of young people opting to undertake a genetic test. Here Lamis Hamdi looks at the NEUROSEC research that she’s been part of to investigate the ethics of predictive genetic testing in Alzheimer’s Disease and the values,… Read more »

BeGOOD’s journey to the Global Mental Health Summit

Back in 2000, I was finishing up my PhD and wondering what to do next. Not unusually, I was a bit panicked. Would I get a job? Would I get funding? How should I follow up my PhD research? Actually that last question was easy: for my PhD I had investigated the social and moral… Read more »

Neuro-discourse: Neuro-enthusiasm or neuro-scepticism? Neuro-ethics (?)

The critical literature on early childhood has grown in recent years. So much so, that in the UK, Routledge (an academic publisher) has an entire series entitled “Contesting Early Childhood”. One of the latest titles in the series is Constructions of Neuroscience in Early Childhood Education, which follows other titles such as Alternative Narratives in Early Childhood,… Read more »

Opportunities and Perils of Extremely Early “Autism” Intervention

Autism, Parent-Blaming and False ‘Cures’ Once again the mainstream autism field risks blaming parents for the cause of autism. This time, through studies often funded by relative-led organisations. The “refrigerator mother” hypothesis blamed supposedly cold parenting for autism. Some of the families who were socially isolated and even split apart by this way of thinking… Read more »

Challenging the Challenge: No Moral Judgment nor Infant Determinism from an Ethnographic Perspective

Introduction Many years ago I heard a teenager screaming to her mother “You are a worm that enters the brain of your own child to drive her crazy!” In those days, blaming mothers for the mental health of their offspring was still a rather private business. Nowadays, the subject has entered the public debate, “in… Read more »

Early Intervention and Children’s Food Policy: Challenging the Emphasis on ‘Choice’

Attention to children’s brain development in the early years has been at the centre of English social policy since the late 1990s, and is linked to recent efforts to ‘improve people’s life chances’.  Children’s food policy has been influenced by the language used in these debates. The belief that habits learnt in the early years… Read more »

From Romania with Neuromania

The Nobel Prize winners David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel demonstrated that kittens deprived of sensory input in one eye at birth remained permanently blind in that eye.  The story of a blind kitten certainly tugs at the heart strings, but Hubel and Weisel, did not only demonstrate the irreversibility of the damage in the shut… Read more »

How do services engage young people in treatment for first episode psychosis?

Psychosis is a medical condition that is most commonly characterised by visual hallucinations and voices, and/or by the presence of grandiose, persecutory or self-blaming delusions. A psychotic episode can be a terrifying and often traumatic experience for young people. This is especially true for those that have previously had limited exposure to or awareness of… Read more »