Posts tagged: At Risk

Ethics of Genetic Testing: Would you like to find out your risk of getting Alzheimer’s disease?

Earlier this year Jessica and Gabi in BeGOOD’s blog ‘Should young people get genetic testing?’ examined the positive and negative implications of young people opting to undertake a genetic test. Here Lamis Hamdi looks at the NEUROSEC research that she’s been part of to investigate the ethics of predictive genetic testing in Alzheimer’s Disease and the values,… Read more »

Neuro-discourse: Neuro-enthusiasm or neuro-scepticism? Neuro-ethics (?)

The critical literature on early childhood has grown in recent years. So much so, that in the UK, Routledge (an academic publisher) has an entire series entitled “Contesting Early Childhood”. One of the latest titles in the series is Constructions of Neuroscience in Early Childhood Education, which follows other titles such as Alternative Narratives in Early Childhood,… Read more »

Ethics and Psychiatric Genetics: Involving Minors in the Debate

Since I was accepted for a DPhil at the University of Oxford, I have enjoyed people’s expression of surprise when they hear that I am based in the Department of Psychiatry – what is a philosopher doing in the Department of Psychiatry? When I then add that my project focuses on the ethical implications of… Read more »

Flawed Logic: Why Policy Makers are Sold on Early Intervention

by Naomi Eisenstadt CB, Independent Advisor on Poverty and Inequality at Scottish Government, and Senior Research Fellow at University of Oxford. For perhaps the last twenty years, policy makers have increasingly shown interest in early intervention. Most influential in this movement has been the work of Graham Allen MP. His first report, Early Intervention: the next… Read more »