Blog

Early Intervention: Justice for babies?

When deliberating on the many claimed benefits for early intervention services a number of ethical questions arise: – Why should the government invest in early intervention programmes? – Why is early intervention ‘right’? – Why is early intervention ‘good’? These inquiries seek to uncover the arguments behind the current UK government’s commitment to early intervention.… Read more »

Flawed Logic: Why Policy Makers are Sold on Early Intervention

by Naomi Eisenstadt CB, Independent Advisor on Poverty and Inequality at Scottish Government, and Senior Research Fellow at University of Oxford. For perhaps the last twenty years, policy makers have increasingly shown interest in early intervention. Most influential in this movement has been the work of Graham Allen MP. His first report, Early Intervention: the next… Read more »

Rethinking Mental Health by Re-prioritising All Our Welfare

by Peter Beresford OBE There is now widespread concern in the UK that mental health policy is in long-term crisis. It has been given low political priority and been grossly under-funded for many years. While policymakers have committed themselves to achieving ‘parity’ between physical and mental health services, there are few if any convincing signs… Read more »

Challenging The Way Things Work

by Dr. Sarah Maxwell MA (Oxon) MB BS MRCPsych, Consultant Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist, Norfolk and Suffolk Foundation Trust, Honorary Senior Lecturer UEA School of Medicine, Winston Churchill Fellow 2016  I confess that I was asked to write a blog about our Youth service set up by the Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust (NSFT)… Read more »

“Ought” and “Is”: The Empirical Neuroethics of Smart Drugs

by Meghana Vagwala, BeGOOD summer intern at the Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford “Work hard, play hard…” …is the unofficial campus credo of my home institution, Duke University. Though a well-intentioned motto, it has recently come under fire as being the byproduct of a competitive culture of “effortless perfection.” Such a culture commonly lowers… Read more »

Rights, Choices and the Law: Reflections on the ‘Policing Pregnancy’ Conference

On Wednesday 13th April I was fortunate enough to attend ‘Policing Pregnancy: A one-day conference on maternal autonomy, risk and responsibility’, held at the Royal College of Physicians, London. The conference examined current behavioral advice given to pregnant women – particularly concerning alcohol consumption and obesity – and how this advice reflects a growing tendency… Read more »